Blooming in November?

New Plants for 2016: First Impressions

I’m one of those lucky garden writers who receives plants from several plant wholesalers to test before the plants are introduced to the public. The companies—Proven Winners and Bailey Nurseries this year—use feedback from writers (and many other plant testers) to make sure the plants will perform well in home gardens.

These are plants that you will likely see in nurseries and garden centers next year. Maybe I’m getting better at growing these new plants or maybe this is just a particularly good year for introductions, but the plants I tried this year were overwhelmingly great.

Here are five that you may want to look for next year.

Campfire bidens blooms weaved around Autumn Joy sedum in my garden in June.
Campfire bidens blooms weaved around Autumn Joy sedum in my garden in June.

Campfire™ Fireburst bidens was one of the most commented on plants when my garden was on a tour earlier this summer. The bright yellow and orange flowers add a dainty element to containers. The blooms were prolific and the plant bloomed most of the season. They took a bit of a break in August, but revived with some fertilizer and more attention to watering.

Holy Moly calibrachoa blended nicely with pink and green coleus. (Note to self: wash off pot before taking photos!)
Holy Moly calibrachoa blended nicely with pink and green coleus.

Superbells® Holy Moly™ calibrachoa is a cousin to Superbells® Cherry Star, which I loved for its bright pink and yellow petunia-like blooms. Holy Moly is predominantly yellow with red-pink accents. It is a prolific bloomer and looked fantastic in several containers. This calibrachoa is known for continuing to bloom even in the fall, and that certainly proved true in this warmer-than-average October. The plant took a break in September, but has been blooming away since then.

container with sedumAnother container plant I really liked was Lemon Coral™ sedum, a  short, chartreuse annual sedum. I used the plant in containers and it added a textural element as well as brightness. This sedum can handle part sun and is great for brightening up a shady corner. Some other garden bloggers have commented that the plant is a bit too aggressive, but I grew it only in containers and did not find that it took over. That may be because the containers were usually in part shade areas.

I’ve never been a huge fan of potentilla, but I really liked the look of the new First Editions® Lemon Meringue™ potentilla from Twin Cities-based Bailey Nurseries. The blooms on this plant look like tiny, yellow roses and the foliage is neat. The plant grows 2 to 3 feet tall and wide, making it a good option for smaller landscapes. Potentilla is completely hardy to northern climates and virtually maintenance free. This looks like a great addition to potentilla options.

divine imptiensThe last plant I’d like to recommend is not new per-se, but is a recent introduction for those who love impatiens but are concerned about downy mildew on impatiens. Northern Gardener Plant to Pick columnist Debbie Lonnee recommended the Divine series of New Guinea impatiens in her column. Since my garden was on a tour and I have a lot of shady spots, I bought an entire flat of them to use to brighten up parts of the garden. They were a bit slow to get going, but once they took off they were gorgeous. (For the tour, I grew some of them in containers, which got them to a bigger size faster, then planted them on the edge of some of my tree, shrub or perennial beds.) While the small frosts we’ve had recently, have nipped some of the Divine impatiens, many are still going strong.

Which plants did well in your garden this year?

Disclaimer: I was sent some of these plants for free, but am under no obligation to write about them and have no financial relationship with Proven Winners or Bailey Nurseries.

 

 

Getting Ready for Seed Starting

Looking at a forecast that includes several days of 60 degree weather, in March, in Minnesota — well, it’s hard not to be thinking about seed starting. But hold off — this too may pass and, in fact, I’m hoping it does. A very early spring can wreck havoc on Minnesota’s outdoor plants as we found out in 2012 when an unreasonably warm March caused fruit trees and other plants to start acting like it was spring only to get zapped by a nasty freeze in April.

I organize seeds by whether I'm starting them indoors or out and on which day.
I organize seeds by whether I’m starting them indoors or out and on which day.

So, while this weather is tempting, stay off the grass and out of your gardens to avoid compacting the thawing earth, and think about indoor seed starting instead. I’m getting ready to start seeds in the next couple of weeks. I’ve checked my light set up to make sure it’s still working and organized my seed box so I know when to start what. This year I’ll be starting a few more annual flowers than I have in the past. I find the home-started annuals do just as well as those I’ve bought as starts and there is a big savings on costs.

This is not a cosmos I started from seed, or grew at all, but isn't it pretty?
This is not a cosmos I started from seed, or grew at all, but isn’t it pretty?

Most of them can be started about the same time as many of your vegetables. Here’s a typical schedule for starting annuals. The “last frost” date in Minnesota is typically in early to mid-May, so I use May 15 to be on the safe side.

8-10 weeks before last frost: Baby’s breath, viola, vinca, alyssum

6-8 weeks before last frost: Snapdragons, ageratum, gomphrena

4-6 weeks before last frost: Celosia, cosmos, sunflower, marigolds, salvia

This year, I’ll be starting baby’s breath, violas, cosmos, sunflowers, marigolds and salvias, in addition to a fair number of vegetables.

What plants will you be starting from seed this year?

Final Exam for New Introductions

pw pots1I’m one of those lucky garden writers who gets sent plants to try out about a year before the plants are introduced to the public. This is fun for me because they’re free (thank you, Proven Winners and Sakata!) and because I get a chance to see what kinds of color trends and plant styles will be on the market next year.

For the plants, this is their final exam before graduation. They’ve been tested like crazy in greenhouses and growing ranges, but always under the care of horticulturists. Now, they must undergo testing by regular gardeners — avid gardeners, of course, but ones that have other jobs, families and the usual distractions from plant maintenance. Good luck to them all!

I got my Proven Winners plants first, so this post deals largely with them. The box included a mix of annuals and perennials, and I put most of them into containers. I especially like the container pictured above with this dark purple coral bells (Dolce® ‘Blackberry Ice’), and a new pink mini-petunia (Supertunia® ‘Flamingo’). I added a side-oats grama, a Minnesota native grass that will be part of my meadow planting. I love the textures of the three plants together and think the pink and purples complement each other.

pwpots2The package also included some new begonias (Surefire™ ‘Rose’), so I combined them with a red calibrachoa (Superbells® ‘Pomegranate Punch’) in a two matching lime green pots. I’m hoping these will do well in the sunny area in my front garden. I used the same combination, along with a dainty ‘Diamond Frost’ euphorbia in another container near the front entry.

Not all the new plants went into containers, however. A diminutive sedum was planted in the front garden, where it will echo the shapes and colors of my other sedums. A couple of new bright purple verbena (Superbena® ‘Violet Ice’) were planted in my Mom’s garden, where they will probably get better care than any of my plants. That lady definitely has a green thumb!

Finally, I have two plants I’m still figuring out where to put. One is a new goji berry—Sweet Lifeberry® (Lycium barbarum) which is said to grow 12 feet tall. I think I have a good spot in back for it, but any time you have a 12-footer, you’ve got to stop to think. The last one is a plant I’ve never heard of—Creme Fraiche™ deutzia. I like its variegated foliage and hope to find a nice spot where it can complement the plants around it. The Proven Winners website recommends it be planted near yellow-flowered perennials or annuals.

As the summer goes on, I’ll report from time to time on how my trial plants are doing — including a post on my Sakata plants.  Which are your favorite of the new plants introduced this year?

Best Container Plant for 2011

Supertunia 'Bordeaux' with sweet potato vine and mixed pansies

There’s no prize with this award, just my unending admiration for a plant that bloomed, bloomed, and bloomed again throughout the cool, hot, humid, slow-to-start, slow-to-end summer of 2011. And the winner is: Supertunia® Bordeaux petunia.

I bought several of these from Eco Gardens in Northfield back in May for my front porch pots, and almost from the moment they were planted until I took them out of the pots on Saturday, they performed beautifully. They grew but did not get leggy, and their blooms were lovely both from the street and up-close. They looked especially nice with two kinds of sweet potato vine: ‘Marguerite’ and ‘Blackie’. The lime green and deep burgundy contrasted beautifully with the violet to deep-purple blooms of Bordeaux.

I’ll be buying Bordeaux again next season. What plant was the star of your containers this year?

Another Fantastic Fall Bloomer

I started these gorgeous marigolds in the vegetable garden from seed back in May. They looked so pretty that I moved them to the front garden to brighten it up this fall. They survived the move and with adequate water show no signs of stopping the bloom parade. The marigolds are from pass-along seeds I got from a gardening friend of my older brother. I plan to collect seeds from these later in the fall and use them to add some bright orange to next year’s garden, too.

Moon Flower at Morning

I took this photo last week, before our first freeze hit, so the foliage on this moon flower is a bit bedraggled now, though it is still blooming. Moon flower has always been a lust plant for me. There are plenty of plants that do not grow well in Minnesota, but for some reason, it has long irked me that moon flower resisted all my attempts to grow it.

My interest may have stemmed from its white blooms, which brighten any garden, or its climbing habit—it is said to grow 20 foot vines in some climates.  It could also be that moon flowers  seemed mysterious and a reminder of an older time. I also could not understand why a plant in the same family as morning glories, which overrun my garden like weeds, would not grow.

This year, I bought moon flower seeds from Baker’s Creek (Ipmoea alba) and started them  indoors. Then, carefully transplanted the seedlings outside later in the spring, planting a few seeds in the same area, just in case. The site is near the front door, so I could keep an eye on them when watering the pots out front. The extra care paid off and the vines have been flowering (usually just one bloom at a time) for the last few weeks.

True to their name, these plants open up overnight. They bloom a day or two, then fade — just like summer itself.