Urban Yard, Prairie Plants

For many reasons, both aesthetic and environmental, some gardeners prefer to use native plants in their yards. In the North, that means plants of the prairie—grasses and wildflowers. The problem is, that not everyone’s neighbors appreciate prairie plants (fortunately, mine do!), and some gardeners—accommodating souls that they are—want to avoid conflict.

Enter Lynn Steiner, former editor of Northern Gardener and an expert on using native plants in all kinds of landscapes. In the current issue of Northern Gardener, which will be on newsstands through October, Lynn offers practical tips on how to use prairie plants in city yards. For instance, if you incorporate straight lines in your landscape, then your use of native plants will look more intentional. She also provides a comprehensive list of plants, both species plants and named cultivars, that work beautifully in urban and suburban settings. Those interested in converting their yards to more prairie landscaping may also want to check out Lynn’s new book, Prairie Style Gardens: Capturing the Essence of the American Prairie Wherever You Live, which will be released by Timber Press in October.

In addition to Lynn’s story, this issue includes an article by Northfield nurseryman Leif Knecht on tips for planting trees and shrubs to ensure healthy roots. I have practiced Leif’s “slash and shred” method of prepping potted plants for planting for many years, and it is one of those “tough love” techniques that really works. Leif also discusses new advances in plastic nursery pots that prevent plants from getting root-bound.

This is a great issue with many more ideas for fall gardening, plus a delightful profile of a fantastic Minneapolis garden. Check it out.

One Reply to “Urban Yard, Prairie Plants”

  1. I have been putting more and more native plants and grasses in my gardens . Last fall I started a native garden only bed. Because I planted in stages (budget allowing), my garden looks a little lopsided right now. However, I can see the potential and really enjoyed each little bloom this year. I have a copy of Lynn Steiner’s book and it is worn out! I can wait to get her new book. Since I live in the county, I don’t have to worry about neighbors not liking my native garden.

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