Fall Bloomers, Part 2

Normally these asters are my favorite fall flower. When they were planted eight years ago, I did not know much about perennials. I got the asters along with a couple of dozen other perennials at an end of season closeout. The next year, I watched the plant all summer thinking, “When is that darn thing going to do something? Is it a flower or a weed?” Then, one September day, I looked out the window andaster-monch.jpg “Wow,” the color was amazing.

Now, it’s looking wimpy. It definitely has a fungus. I could spray, but I try not to use a lot of fungicides in the yard, so I’m going to take the low-tech approach. As soon as it finishes blooming, I’ll cut down the foliage completely, and throw it away in the garbage–not the compost. Because the plant was looking sickly, I consulted my perennial Bible, Growing Perennials in Cold Climates by Mike Heger and John Whitman. Mike is a contributor to Northern Gardener and also owner of Ambergate Gardens in Victoria, MN.

Mike and John recommend dividing asters every year or two. Mine have never been divided. So after I finish cutting them back, I’ll probably divide the crown and move it to the plant holding bed I’m setting up in the backyard. Plants sometimes benefit from moving around, so I’m going to move the asters to a different location in the garden next spring. We’ll see if that perks up their bloom.

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